News OK Interview

Short but sweet interview (it appears just with Rado) from a local Oklahoma paper. Covers the “old influences” question well:

During his not-always-legal music download binges as a teenager, Rado would find himself going down the rabbit hole, letting one classic album open the doors to another. He found himself attracted not only to recognized classics, but to unusual cult albums such as Skip Spence’s mad folk-rock masterpiece, “Oar.” Rado and France were always careful not to imitate the music they were collecting. Instead, Rado said he treated each dive into an important album like an education in song structures and arrangements.

Along with some thoughts on their multi-instrumentalism:

“If you have the knowledge of one instrument, you can sort of figure out the other ones pretty easily — at least for me,” Rado said. “It just stemmed into like, ‘Oh, we need a violin on this song and I can kind of play a guitar,’ so I’d just tune the violin weird and figure out how to bow it. I spent a few days learning how to do that just to get a violin on something.”

[…]

“We saw the Lips when we were, like 15, and it was just really inspiring watching him go around and play keyboards, then guitar, then pedals and stuff,” he said. “We’re really, really into the Flaming Lips, so I think for a long time, we were trying to do things that sounded like the Flaming Lips, or a little like Beck, too.”

But Foxygen is constantly moving on to new musical ideas. Rado said that they are trying to make a “difficult follow-up” to “Peace & Magic,” an album designed to be a misunderstood classic.

And some (perhaps tongue-in-cheek) thoughts on their next album:

“The next one is going to be sort of like our idea of a ‘failed record,’ like a record that makes no money?” Rado said. “Like ‘Oar’ or ‘McCartney II’ or the first Lindsey Buckingham record or ‘Tusk.’ It’s like, ‘I don’t know where I’m at in my career or what kind of record I want to make, and I just got this synthesizer and I don’t know how to use it, but I’m going to put it on every song.’”